Expose the Truth About Skin Care

skin care myths

As you sort through managing a proper skin care regimen and maintaining a healthy lifestyle, you’re not always equipped with the correct information. Lucky for you, we’ve tackled a handful of common myths that you might encounter in your quest for beautiful, healthy-looking skin.

Say What?

Myth #1—Skin should feel tight after you wash. That means it’s clean!
If your skin feels tight after cleansing then you have stripped the skin of all of its water, causing dead skin cells to build up on the surface.1 To combat this, avoid strong cleansers like bar soaps. Remember that what you cleanse with is the foundation and most important part of your skin care routine.

Myth #2—Consuming greasy foods and chocolate will make your skin breakout!
You may have heard this and even passed it along to your kids. While this myth might inspire you to eat healthier, there is no evidence that supports this claim. Food does not contribute to the prevention of, healing of, or the cause of acne break outs.2

Myth #3—Smoking is only bad for your lungs. It has nothing to do with your skin!
Wrong! Not only is smoking terrible for your lungs, it also makes you look older and may contribute to wrinkles. Smoking narrows the tiny blood vessels in the outer layer of the skin, and depletes the skin of oxygen and nutrients that are essential to skin health.1 The easiest way to avoid this is to quit smoking!

Myth #4—The more you use a product, the less effective it is.
Many people believe that your skin becomes resistant to a product over time, which is also false. Your skin is continually renewing itself—old, dead skin cells are constantly pushed to the surface as new, fresh cells are being created every day. In normal, healthy skin, cells are regenerated approximately every 30 to 40 days.3-5 So, eventually, the skin cells you’ve transformed to become healthy will naturally die and fall off. However, when you alter your regimen, you may affect the healthy cell renewal process.

Myth #5—You don’t need sunscreen. Your makeup already has it!
Just because you’re wearing makeup with SPF doesn’t mean you’re protected. Studies indicate that you would have to wear 14 to 15 times the amount of makeup a typical person would wear in order to achieve the SPF on the label.6 Therefore, it’s important to use a sunscreen in addition to your makeup, even on cloudy days.

Now that you’re armed with accurate information about skin care, we want to hear from you. Toothpaste fights acne? Your hair will grow back thicker after you shave? Leave us a comment with some of the other skin care myths you’ve heard. If we can’t debunk it, maybe someone else can!

References: 1. Skin care: 5 tips for healthy skin. Mayo Clinic Web site.
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/skin-care/SN00003/. Updated December 6, 2011. Accessed August 8, 2012.
2. Food does not cause acne. AcneNet Web site.
http://www.skincarephysicians.com/acnenet/acne_and_diet.html. Accessed August 20, 2012.
3. Grove GL, Kligman AM. Age-associated changes in human epidermal cell renewal. J Gerontol. 1983;38(2):137-142.
4. Weinstein GD, McCullough JL, Ross P. Cell proliferation in normal epidermis. J Invest Dermatol. 1984;82(6):623-628.
5. Farage MA, Miller KW, Maibach HI, eds. Textbook of Aging Skin. Berlin, Germany: Springer; 2010:280-282.
6. 9 skin care myths. WebMD Website.
http://www.webmd.com/healthy-beauty/features/9-skin-care-myths. Updated July 21, 2009. Accessed August 8, 2012.

Facebook Like Box

Find Obagi

Obagi Twitter Feed