Vitamin C: The Super Antioxidant Your Skin Is Craving

Oranges and Obagi Pro-C Serums

Your mom was right when she told you to take your vitamins. Not only do they make you healthy and strong, but many vitamins are beneficial to your skin, too. In fact, Vitamin C is offered in topical formulas that can be applied to the skin and can help prevent skin aging and protect against sun damage.1

Benefits of Vitamin C

The topical form of Vitamin C is called ascorbic acid, and it is known as “the most important skin antioxidant.”2 Antioxidants protect against damage caused by harmful molecules called free radicals as well as environmental pollutants.3 In particular, the antioxidant Vitamin C works by speeding up the skin’s natural repair systems and by directly inhibiting further damage.4 Numerous clinical studies have proven the skin benefits of Vitamin C and confirmed that it can help protect against the signs of skin damage by:

  • Stimulating collagen synthesis1
  • Reducing inflammation1
  • Suppressing pigmentation5
  • Retaining moisture6
  • Enhancing UV protection1
  • Replenishing Vitamin E7

Not All Topical Vitamin C Is Created Equal

There are many Vitamin C preparations on the market that claim to do amazing things for your skin. But be aware that Vitamin C in its most commonly found forms is highly unstable when exposed to oxygen, rendering it ineffective.8

Fortunately, Obagi Professional-C SerumsTM use a Vitamin C formula in its most stable form, and absorbs and remains in the skin longer to offer maximum antioxidant benefit.9,10 Our Professional-C Serums are available in 4 strengths for different skin types and needs.

So continue eating your fruits and veggies for all the health benefits they offer; and book an appointment with your skin care physician to learn more about Professional-C Serums and how topical Vitamin C can help you look good, too.

References:
1. Farris PK. Topical vitamin C: a useful agent for treating photoaging and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatol Surg. 2005;31(7, pt 2):814-818.
2. Lewis AB, Regan K. Dermatological procedure enhancement products: a beneficial means to combat aging skin. US Dermatol Review. 2006;1-5.
3. Davis JL. How antioxidants work. WebMD Web site. http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/how-antioxidants-work1. Accessed April 9, 2013.
4. Watson S. Skin care vitamins and antioxidants. WebMD Web site. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-supplements/lifestyle-guide-11/beauty-skin-care-vitamins-antioxidants. Accessed April 9, 2013.
5. Kameyama K, Sakai C, Kondoh S, et al. Inhibitory effect of magnesium L-ascorbyl-2-phosphate (VC-PMG) on melanogenesis in vitro and in vivo. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1996;34(1):29-33.
6. Campos PM, Goncalves GM, Gaspar LR. In vitro antioxidant activity and in vivo efficacy of topical formulations containing vitamin C and its derivatives studied by non-invasive methods. Skin Res Technol. 2008;14(3):376-380.
7. Burgess C. Topical vitamins. J Drugs Dermatol. 2008;7(suppl 7):s2-s6.
8. Understanding skin care products. WebMD Web site. http://www.webmd.com/beauty/face/skin-care-products?page=2. Accessed April 9, 2013.
9. OMP, Inc. Data on file.
10. Lehman PA, Investigator, PRACS Institute. Determination of the percutaneous absorption kinetics of ascorbic acid and ascorbic acid 2-glucoside, in vitro, using the human cadaver skin model (protocol R07-0278, August 2007). OMP, Inc. Data on file. 

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